My Manic Moodle Muddling and Multiple Motivations

In this module we are being asked to blog about who we are, what has challenged us in the course, what we have learned and how we have applied it to our course designs. In my last post I discussed the challenges of decision making about course “chunking,” and my thoughts on that as a veteran Instructional Designer with extensive multi-LMS experience. I also discussed in several previous posts about my goal to gamefy the course design, while simultaneously maintaining motivation and engagement for different levels and skill sets of a community college student population. In this post I would like to expand on what it is like to be a learner: learning Moodle, learning gaming strategies, and being a student in this course in general.

Being a student in this course

I have been asked repeatedly by faculty friends and others during my tenure as an ETAP grad student why I am taking these courses. The easy answer would be that I want to get a degree in the field in which I have been working for almost 30 years (education/teaching) with a focus on what is most exciting to me (technology integration and online learning) – in other words get “credentialed”. But that would not completely explain why I have doggedly chipped away at this degree for almost 10 years now.

While I train faculty in a 12 week class every semester, that closely parallels this course, I find that I am regularly updating the materials and rethinking the multiple strategies presented to my trainees. What I find most challenging about that is the not infrequent resistance to learning a new teaching strategy that I encounter on the part of some trainees. This has been true in every institution that I have been training faculty. I once had a trainee who was a lawyer tell me that teaching is teaching and just because it is online does not mean you have to do anything different – and she truly believed that. I know that is not true, and I know there is an extensive body of research on how students learn in different environments, and I know that more research is done every year. I believe the more we know and the more questions we ask, the better able to remain flexible, dynamic and progressive in our teaching strategies. I know that if I can be the “designated learner” for theory, practice and technology, I can help faculty strategize more effectively and appropriately for their discipline and course level. The ETAP courses I have taken over the last 10 years have given me dedicated time to dig deeper into the research, reaffirm the foundation concepts I have, and most importantly learn new things from new research as well as fellow students and the instructors. Rather than sit back and feel like I have already learned everything there is to learn, I actually look for different approaches, challenge my own assumptions, get cool ideas from other students, and practice peer teaching presence with an eye toward bringing this back into my own training. This particular course is helping me understand how my faculty trainees who learned to use Moodle are thinking about the tools, and how best to help them conceptualize a different LMS and make the transition.

Learning Moodle

Within the first week of this class I realized I could make a big list of documents, create a few forums and assignment drop boxes, maybe a few quizzes and be done. Those components seemed simple enough. But I also noticed that every time I got a grade, I got an email telling me my grade was changed to “F” – so probably basic tools were not as simple as I thought. Then I looked at documentation to see how some of the tools worked, what the lexicon for the product was, and how I would need to adjust my work flow. My first impression was, “Wow – this feels like something pieced together by a committee!!” Then I realized, oh yeah – it was – a committee of thousands because it is open source. And like many (but not all) open source products I have used, I see very elaborate tools and settings to do some pretty detailed stuff, and some glaring basics that are just simply not sexy enough to warrant attention. For instance, table display. There really is no excuse in 2014 for a web based product not to be able to display basic html table code properly. Or for it not to be more urgently addressed (I researched the reporting history, which is long). Many helpful members of the global committee have workarounds. My favorite? Go to the code for every individual cell in your table and use the Advanced¬† tools to change the properties, with subsequent suggestions for using find and replace on the code. How about just fixing it?

Annoyances aside, I have a dilemma. I don’t know how the more advanced interactive tools work in Moodle and yet I want to structure the course in such a way that I can collect data to gamefy and score. I call this the “chicken and egg” design dilemma when working with my trainees: How to design a course with unknown tools. If we teach all the tools they won’t be remembered when the content and interaction actually get designed. If we build content we may find that we have used the wrong tool as we get further into the process. The solution so far has been a very basic, very flexible template that allows faculty to “hang” stuff around the course as they see how things work. I tell them to “trust me” because at about week 5 they will know the basics of how the tools work and will suddenly rethink the entire course, including ways to break apart the template into something that works better for them. And here I am in essentially that “week 5” sweet spot of knowing just enough about Moodle to be dangerous.

I have spent a great deal of time in the Moodle documentation, and I can see that I will need some pretty complicated tools to do what I want to do. And that the lexicon is totally unfamiliar, the processes very hands on with few presets that I recognize, and an overall zeitgeist that is pretty cool, but will take some time to master. Fortunately for me I am working with a course I already taught and do not have to develop all the material, just revise and retool some of it. But I am thinking I need databases for much of what I need to do and they have been very challenging. I have created a few, but still don’t have the core concept internalized well enough to use it effectively to meet my goals. (Frankly, I can’t imagine what others in the class with no LMS background are going through.) I want to build a functional course using the tools effectively. I know how to do that in about 5 other LMS environments as well as basic web sites, but Moodle is slow to reveal its secrets. I have no doubt I can do it, but can I do it in a few weeks?

Learning Gaming Strategies

Gaming strategies are a totally foreign concept to me. I don’t play games (unless an occasional Words with Friends on my phone counts). I don’t play or watch sports. I am not competitive. I don’t care about badges, leveling, points or winning. But I DO like the pace and flow of working through a challenge in steps and succeeding over obstacles and experiencing “Fiero!”. So I can relate on the basis of internal motivation, and personal success.

I don’t know if my gaming strategies will actually work because they are mostly theoretical, except for my experience with the quizzes I currently use. I do know that even if I learn about a game strategy, I try to figure out how it parallels and replicates engaged learning. I am finding significant overlap and using those components as starting points. For example, “leveling up” and “failing up” are two ideas from gaming that are exactly what is happening with my multiple attempt weekly quizzes. I just didn’t know at the time that it was a proven game strategy.

I also just changed all my modules to Quests. I tend to think of my entire course as a WebQuest anyway, and I suddenly realized that expanding that concept will create more believable social dynamics and goals for leveling up and earning badges and points. Or for those who are intrinsically motivated, a more authentic inquiry based process.

Conclusion

The pieces I am trying to bring together in this course as a student, and in the course I am designing, are coming from a past I am challenging in as many ways as I can, decades of teaching I am critically sifting through in my mind, new research I am finally getting the time to study closely, and a fairly comprehensive knowledge of systems. Frankly I do not recognize the course and structures that are emerging as I work. It is almost like sitting outside myself and watching it happen. Every piece that goes together generates another idea or connection. Now all I have to do is figure out how to make it actually work.

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